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CHEST IMAGE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 78

Soft tissue calcification in chronic kidney disease


1 Department of General Medicine, M.E.S. Medical College, Perinthalmanna, Kerala, India
2 Department of Geriatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar

Date of Web Publication16-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
A Jemshad
Department of General Medicine, M.E.S. Medical College, Perinthalmanna, Kerala - 679 338
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2320-8775.158886

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How to cite this article:
Jemshad A, Abdulla MC, kunnummal NK. Soft tissue calcification in chronic kidney disease. J Assoc Chest Physicians 2015;3:78

How to cite this URL:
Jemshad A, Abdulla MC, kunnummal NK. Soft tissue calcification in chronic kidney disease. J Assoc Chest Physicians [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Feb 27];3:78. Available from: https://www.jacpjournal.org/text.asp?2015/3/2/78/158886

A 31-year-old male diagnosed to have chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis for past 6 years was admitted with fatigue and generalized body pain for 3 months. Examination showed pallor and generalized edema. Investigations showed normocytic normochromic anemia and renal failure. His calcium-phosphorus product was 74 mg 2 /dl 2 . His chest X-ray showed nonhomogenous opacities in both upper zones [Figure 1]a. X-ray of hand showed calcifications in the subcutaneous tissue [Figure 1]b. Computed tomography thorax revealed soft tissue calcifications in the anterior chest wall [Figure 1]c and d. Subcutaneous tissue calcification is seen in conditions like tumoral calcinosis, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), scleroderma, or venous insufficiency. [1] In ESRD, it is due to inappropriately high level of calcium and phosphorus. These lesions are usually seen when the calcium-phosphorus product exceeds 75 mg 2 /dl 2 , and there is a direct correlation between their prevalence and duration of ESRD. [2] Most lesions are asymptomatic and large lesions may produce neuropathic symptoms due to the compression of adjacent nerves.
Figure 1: Chest X-ray showing nonhomogenous opacities in both upper zones (a). X-ray of hand showing calcifications in the subcutaneous tissue (b). Computed tomography thorax showing soft tissue calcifications in the anterior chest wall (c and d)

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  References Top

1.
Banks KP, Bui-Mansfield LT, Chew FS, Collinson F. A compartmental approach to the radiographic evaluation of soft-tissue calcifications. Semin Roentgenol 2005;40:391-407.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Durant DM, Riley LH 3 rd , Burger PC, McCarthy EF. Tumoral calcinosis of the spine: A study of 21 cases. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2001;26:1673-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


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