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CASE REPORT
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 81-82

Unusual complication of intercostal chest drainage insertion: Retained surgical blade in liver


1 Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (T&E), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of General and Laparoscopic Surgery, Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Anshuman Darbari
Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (T&E), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Rishikesh - 249 203, Uttarakhand
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2320-8775.202900

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Intercostal chest tube drainage or tube thoracostomy procedure is widely used by the medical, surgical and critical care specialists. Despite being relatively a minor procedure, devastating complications can occur owing to inadequate knowledge of thoracic anatomy, improper training and lack of experience. Iatrogenic or technical complications are however rare, but can often be life-threatening. Here, we are reporting a case of an accidentally retained surgical blade in the right lobe of liver during chest tube insertion for the management of post-traumatic right pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever case report of a retained surgical blade in the liver as a complication of tube thoracostomy procedure, which was later successfully removed using laparoscopy.


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